Brigham Young University Campus Buildings

Considered to be the largest private university on the United States, Brigham Young University offers a unique experience and a rich history. Founded in 1875 as an academy for students of all ages, it has grown into a well-regarded university that offers degrees in hundreds of topics. Brigham Young University, called BYU or “The Y” for short, is owned and run by the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, also known as the Mormons. Located in Provo, Utah, it is nestled in the mountains and provides a small-town charm to a large school. BYU started off as a small academy in a small building near the center of Provo and has expanded to cover almost 600 acres, ranging from the center of the town to the mountainside with the emblematic white Y painted on the side. This tour describes the many buildings that have existed as part of BYU campus over its more than a century of existence.

Deseret Towers

By 1962, enrollment had increased by 25% as hundreds of returned missionaries and transfer students swelled the student populations to unprecedented levels. Even with the recent additions of Heritage and Helaman Halls, the rise in the student…

George Brimhall Building

Who was George Brimhall? An early graduate of Brigham Young Academy, George Brimhall returned to the school as its president in 1903 when the current president Cluff went on an expedition to South America. He was appointed as the president the next…

The Harris Fine Arts Center

The Franklin S. Harris Fine Arts Center (HFAC) is named for former BYU president Franklin Stewart Harris. Born in Benjamin, Utah Territory, in 1884, he began his studies at BYU and finished with a doctorate in agronomy from Cornell University. In…

Harvey Fletcher Engineering Laboratory Building

For a building that found itself in an article entitled “3 BYU Buildings You Didn’t Know Existed,” the BYU Fletcher Building has quite a legacy. Its namesake, Harvey L. Fletcher, was a renowned scientist credited with aiding in the discovery of the…

Helaman Halls

In 1953, and in response to a rising need for affordable student housing, BYU administration completed the plan for a new complex of men’s dorm rooms. Originally to be located in the northeast portion of campus, it was soon moved to a plot of land…

Heber J. Grant Building

Who was Heber J. Grant? Heber J. Grant was born in Salt Lake City in 1856, before Utah was made a state. He was well connected to the leadership of the LDS church, and eventually became the President of the LDS Church. He was well known for his…

Heritage Halls

By the early 1950’s, many of the early BYU student housing was old or soon to be turned over to the Language Training Mission, the predecessor to the MTC. To help provide space for single students, BYU President Ernest Wilkinson announced the…

Jesse Knight Building

Known affectionately as Uncle Jesse, Jesse Knight’s generosity made him crucial to the development of the early BYU and the economic success of the area. He helped to make BYU the school that it is today and earned the honor of a building bearing…

Joseph Smith Memorial Building

The Joseph Smith Building (JSB) that currently resides on the south end of BYU campus is not the first building to be named after the first prophet of the LDS church. The Joseph Smith Building that preceded it was built in 1941 and served as a center…

Karl G. Maeser Building

Who was Karl G. Maeser? Karl G. Maeser was born in 1828 in Germany and is considered to be the founder of Brigham Young Academy, the early predecessor to Brigham Young University. While he actually did not found the school, he was instrumental to…

Women's Gymnasium

In the early 1900s, BYU sporting events and dances were held in the Training Building and BYU High School. In 1912, President George H. Brimhall acknowledged that a new building was needed to accommodate the growth of the school. He set aside the…
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