House Museums

A historic house museum is exactly what its title says – a house that has been turned into a museum. They often contain the inhabitants’ belongings displayed in a way that reflects their original placement and usage in the home. The narrative of who lived in the home tells the story of a particular area, social class, or historical period. Learning about inhabitants of house museums provides a more personalized and unique experience than one found in a regular museum.

The Copper King Mansion

Born in 1839, Williams Andrews Clark worked on a farm until he was fourteen years old. He attended law school for two years, taught from 1859 to 1860, then moved westward to try his luck with the Gold Rush in 1862. Arriving in Butte a few years late,…

The Riordan Mansion State Historic Park

Starting off as middle-class, second-generation Irish immigrants, the Riordans amassed a fortune in the lumber industry in Flagstaff, Arizona. The eldest brother, Denis “Matthew” Riordan, became the foreman of the Ayer Lumber Mill in 1884. In 1887,…

The Kendrick Mansion and Trail End

Trail End, also called the Kendrick Mansion, served as home to John Benjamin Kendrick and his family. A self-educated man from Texas, Kendrick had a successful career as a rancher, banker, and politician. He married Eula Wulfjen in 1891, and together…

The Kit Carson Home & Museum

Christopher “Kit” Carson is a complicated figure in U.S. history. He served as a saddle maker, wagon driver, trapper, hunter, soldier, rancher, freemason, federal Indian agent, and the star of many dime novels. Many consider him a hero of the Old…

The Ivinson Mansion and Laramie Plains Museum

Edward Ivinson was born in 1830 in the Virgin Islands. At the age of twenty-three, he married the English-born Jane Wood. They moved to Laramie City in 1868 where the family helped establish numerous local ventures. In 1868, Edward Ivinson ran a…